Untitled

architectureofdoom:


первый жилой дом серии Т-22 на проспекте свободы
1986

Kiev

architectureofdoom:

первый жилой дом серии Т-22 на проспекте свободы

1986

Kiev

(Source: prichastiye)

gallowhill:

Sumet Jumsai - The Robot Building, Bangkok, Thailand, 1986

gallowhill:

Sumet Jumsai - The Robot Building, Bangkok, Thailand, 1986

(via architectureland)

architectureofdoom:


infiniteinterior:
Yoji Watanabe (via)

New Sky Building #5, Tokyo, 1971

architectureofdoom:

infiniteinterior:

Yoji Watanabe (via)

New Sky Building #5, Tokyo, 1971

scavengedluxury:

Avenida de la Aurora. Málaga, Feb 2014.

scavengedluxury:

Avenida de la Aurora. Málaga, Feb 2014.

(via architectureofdoom)

architectureofdoom:

De Bazel building, Amsterdam, Karel de Bazel, 1919-26.
Built as the office for the Nederlandsche Handel-Maatschappij, now used to house the city archives. View this on the map

architectureofdoom:

De Bazel building, Amsterdam, Karel de Bazel, 1919-26.

Built as the office for the Nederlandsche Handel-Maatschappij, now used to house the city archives. View this on the map

(Source: cf.hum.uva.nl)

wurlington:

One of the strangest houses in the Chicago area, this unusual bunker-like home in Oak Park was designed by architect Errol Jay Kirsch in 1982.

(via architectureofdoom)

cjwho:

The Oceanographic Museum - Monte Carlo, Monaco
This monumental architectural work of art has an impressive façade above the sea, towering over the sheer cliff face to a height of 279 feet (85.04 m). It took 11 years to build, using 100,000 tons of stone from La Turbie. The museum is home to exhibitions and collections of various species of sea fauna (starfish, seahorses, turtles, jellyfish, crabs, lobsters, rays, sharks, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, eels, cuttlefish etc.) both stuffed and in skeletal form. The museum’s holdings also include a great variety of sea related objects, including model ships, sea animal skeletons, tools, weapons, etc.
CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

cjwho:

The Oceanographic Museum - Monte Carlo, Monaco

This monumental architectural work of art has an impressive façade above the sea, towering over the sheer cliff face to a height of 279 feet (85.04 m). It took 11 years to build, using 100,000 tons of stone from La Turbie.
The museum is home to exhibitions and collections of various species of sea fauna (starfish, seahorses, turtles, jellyfish, crabs, lobsters, rays, sharks, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, eels, cuttlefish etc.) both stuffed and in skeletal form. The museum’s holdings also include a great variety of sea related objects, including model ships, sea animal skeletons, tools, weapons, etc.

CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

(via architectureland)

thesmithian:

…the small country of Burkina Faso near the border to Ghana…with the plentiful raw materials available the Kassena people make some of the most culturally rich and architecturally beautiful villages, such as this one in Tiébélé…the dwellings occupy a community of just over one hectare…and are made of a sun-dried mix of clay, soil, straw and cow droppings moistened to a perfect mortar, mixed by foot to create strong pottery-like structures.

much more, here.

(via architectureofdoom)